Futuristic Living and Organic Architecture Pt. 1

For my workouts I started to watch videos on ted.com. Coz I wanna gets smartz, y’all. That’s why. Some of the speeches are very good, and practically all of them are very informative, catering to whatever you just happen to like at that moment. I stumbled upon two videos in specific that caught my attention, both of them being about the future of architecture. They deal with questions of sustainability, eco-friendliness and the incorporation of nature and living matter into architectural processes. The first (and short, only 2:57 ) video features Mitchell Joachim, where he talks in “Don’t build your home, grow it!” about using plants and chemically engineered tissue for building homes. Enjoy below.

Some of the ideas he presents in his speech are already being used by other people over the world, who try to grow homes. Below you find structures grown of trees who were “woven” together, using the incredible feature of tree-trunks that, well, they grow together if you force them long enough at a tender age. The structures are “designed” by (1) Konstantin Kirsch and Richard Reames (via fennelandfern.co.uk), (2) Hermann Block (via konstantin-kirsch.de), (3+4) a bunch of people in northeastern India (sorry for not being able in this case to be more specific [and yes, I blame western arrogance], copyright held by Vanlal Tochhawng, via v1kram.posterous.com). 

 

But combining nature and architecture can go in a very different direction, too. There’s tons of examples where organic architecture focuses more on the aesthetiques of organisms and tries to incorporate buildings into landscapes, nevertheless trying to make living things integral parts of the construction. One example is the “Urban Forest” by Chinese architecture studio MAD Ltd. (they hold copyright to the pictures below, by clicking them you get to their website)

Of course these MAD Ltd. designs totally remind me (and probably you, too) of science-fiction paintings and renderings that make the future seem a pretty sweet place to live in (or time, that is). Take for example the picture “Futuristic City Complex” below by artist Staszek Marek (who holds copyright, via coolvibe.com):

Or to take it even further, the below image by Mark Goerner (holding copyright, via cgfriend.org) where the city structure is not built into the natural setting, but the nature is rather built into the city itself:

 

The Urban Free Habitat System by Danish studio N55 pursues another architectural approach and does not create a static space for human beings, but lets the human being decide where to create his_her resident space. By using a simple steel construction seemingly public and open spaces can be transformed into private settings and zones of personal comfort.

Copyright of the above pictures with N55. You can visit their website by clicking here or any of the photos above.
Obviously, questions about sustainability and nature conservation arise, but more pressing for most would probably be to hear about plans for bad weather, unwelcome observers and the like (to be fair: they do address these issues in the according manual on their site).

The following pictures by Ilkka Halso take a different approach to nature and its relation to architecture by visually wondering what happens when we build around nature. Or specifically for nature, since we might be in need of preserving the little residue that is still left to us. And thus, what we often take as a given, becomes a museum object: 

Copyright to all of these gorgeous pictures by Ilkka Halso. You can get to the website either by clicking here or one of the above pictures.

And I’ll just close this post (there’ll be more though, that’s why it is entitled Pt. 1) with the second ted-talk I watched on the issue: Rachel Armstrong talks in “Architecture that repairs itself?” about her research into metabolic materials for architecture, imagining a way to restore the foundation of Venice and more (video duration 7:32).

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2 thoughts on “Futuristic Living and Organic Architecture Pt. 1

  1. I love TED. Wenn du sie nicht schon kennst:
    Toller Talk von Amy Mullins

    und von Jonathan Harris über sein Gefühlssuche-Programm.

    Gerade letzterer ist als Blogger ganz interessant. Wer weiß welche Gefühlssätze von dir da gerade herumschwirren….

    Ps: Ted läuft bei mir auch immer dann, wenn ich denke ich müßte mal wieder was machen das ich kluk werde….;-)

    1. “Pamela Anderson has more prosthetics in her body than me and she is not considered to be disabled”

      super satz!

      Vielen Dank für die links, hab beide noch nicht gesehen, aber sehr sehr spannend.
      supercrazy auch, was technisch geht zwecks internet-scannen und so, bzw. was für fantastische sachen menschen auch damit machen.
      danke!

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